Mayo Clinic and Google: COVID-19 data show the importance of liquidity

 Mayo Clinic and Google: COVID-19 data show the importance of liquidity



The organizations formed a partnership over the past decade to promote AI and ML innovations in the healthcare system. Later, the corona virus novel began to spread.


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Mayo Clinic and Google: COVID-19 data show the importance of liquidity

Over the past year, organizations have partnered for over a decade to promote AI and ML innovations in the healthcare system. Later, the corona virus novel began to spread.

Kat Jerzych August 26, 202012: 13 p.m.


Last May, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota announced a ten-year partnership with Google to enhance the health system's cloud - based artificial intelligence and machine learning capabilities.


[COVID19] What can we do to gain an understanding of the course course of the disease, to cure and cure the disease, to improve what we do, and even to do our first work? Ross added.


In the presentation, Ross teamed up with Ashima Gupta, Director, Google Cloud Global Healthcare Solutions, to bring a health care organization for AI and ML to Prime; Dr. John Halamka, President of the Mayo Clinic Forum; James Buntrock, Mayo Vice President, Information Technology; And Google Cloud Healthcare and Life Sciences Engineering Director Ilya Tulchinsky to discuss lessons learned from the first half of the partnership and what the institutions hope to accomplish in the future.


"Our vision here was to bring together two large organizations to improve health care," Ross said.


"In many ways, the epidemic has been a catalyst for removing barriers and encouraging collaboration - even among competitors," Halamka said, adding that a number of software giants have been motivated to work together for the good of society.


"Technology is a real activator," he added.


In general, Tulchinsky explained that starting an organization for AI and ML involves three main stages: data aggregation, agreement, and analysis. Especially when it comes to healthcare, the data have a high level of complexity, with different data ontologies and modalities and a large amount of information.


"Origin and lineage are really important," Talchinsky said. "What is the trajectory of the data so far?"


Tulchinsky also noted the importance of integrating AI and ML into a clinical workflow.


“We can have the best model in the world, and it may fail to be useful if we do not get the integration right,” he said. "Bringing the right data, at the right time, in the right way, to a busy health care professional is crucial to the success of AI and ML efforts," he added.


Buntrock cited several examples of AI and ML used in Mayo, noting that the system relied on data to shape its COVID-19 response.


“We can’t predict what will happen in the last ten months,” he said. “We definitely need data liquidity.


"As an organization, we have had to react very quickly in the pursuit of data that gives us a better understanding of bed management, personal protective equipment and staff. 19] Predict different types of events based on how the virus evolved between races, ”he said.


Presenters, however, emphasized the importance of striking a balance between short-term and long-term needs.


"Yes, COVID-19 has created a new set of emergencies," Gupta said. "But the primary task we are doing is to position our joint work to move the needle forward."


"Ultimately, it's about creating better AI-enabled tools to enhance clinical research [and] clinical and operational processes and take patients on their journey with us," Gupta added.


She advised healthcare organizations looking to make their own efforts, saying, "Start with purpose and people, first think about building the foundation, then think about safety and privacy, then put those principles first, and share them broadly with your team members." with the. "


Six months later, the shape of health care has changed dramatically in response to the COVID-19 epidemic, and so have many of Mayo's priorities.


“This was an opportunity for us to really try this model in an emergency setting,” said Chris Ross, chief information officer at the Mayo Clinic, at a conference at the HIMSS Learning Center this week.

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